1965 Ford T5 Mustang 289 Convertible 4-speed manual. Wimbledon White with Red interior with matching centre console, new white roof with red tonneau cover and chrome steel GT wheels with new radial tyres. Restored to factory specification and fitted with its original 289 V8 A-Code (GT) 4-speed manual gearbox and factory Power Steering.
The Ford T5 is a rare car. Produced for the European German market with only a few hundred being delivered. However, the name Mustang was already trademarked and owned by two German companies Krupp and bicycle manufacturer Kreidler. This meant Ford could not use the brand name “Mustang” without a potentially long-drawn-out legal battle and for reasons unclear today declined the offer from Krupp to buy the rights to the name for $10, 000.

As Ford’s internal product name for the Mustang was T5 they decided to badge the German cars as such, removing all references to the word Mustang with only the radiator grille remaining as the last Mustang memento.

The careful and detailed restoration was carried out over several years with the intention of producing a car that looked just like it did in 1965 and very clearly achieving that goal. Comes with its spare wheel and tools, matching boot mat and wheel cover.

So here we have a very unusual and incredibly rare Mustang and as far as we are aware the only T5 Convertible for sale in the world. Presenting in lovely fully restored condition throughout and is a total pleasure to drive.

Just back from our workshop after pre-sale checks where it also received a new service, engine tune and replacement of the points with electronic ignition.

A detailed walk-around & POV Test Drive can be found on our website.

Ford could have hardly anticipated this. When the company wanted to introduce its biggest hit of the 1960’s to the German market, a car that had broken sales records in the US, management in the US received an unpleasant surprise: The name “Mustang” had already been trademarked by two German companies, Krupp and bicycle manufacturer Kreidler.
Instead, they renamed the “Mustang” the “T5”. Why T5? Because it had been the internal Ford product code name of the Mustang during the development phase.
Now they could start, and Ford could do it in style. The T5 was advertised in Germany with great promotional expense and the successful model sold with operating instructions in German, which was rather unusual for imported cars at that time.
To clarify, the DSO code (Domestic Special Order / District Code) is first referenced. This code provides the first information on whether an exported vehicle is involved.
At that time, Ford used DSO’s from 90 to 99 for exports, while for the T5 they used codes from 90 to 96. This means that all T5s have to have a DSO code in the 90’s.
The DSO code is found on a stamped metal plate with the respective number and located on the right or left inner fender.
The most obvious difference is the (missing) Mustang lettering that was replaced with a newly designed T5 emblem. For the first models, which were 1964 ½, only a decal borrowed from the Ford Comet was applied; starting in 1965 a T5 emblem made of metal was used.
Only the pony symbol on the radiator grille remained as the last Mustang memento. Along with the purely cosmetic changes, there were also a few changes to the chassis. Because Ford USA felt that the original, fairly comfortable, chassis could not handle German roads, stiffer struts and shocks were installed. Last but not least, other headlights had to be installed due to the special German regulations.
All in all, these changes and the fact that only a few hundred units were exported to Europe.

The careful and detailed restoration was carried out over several years with the intention of producing a car that looked just like it did in 1965 and very clearly achieving that goal. Comes with its spare wheel and tools, matching boot mat and wheel cover.

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